politics

What Now?

I’m not a liberal. I’m not a safe space, social crusader. I’m not a sore loser who can’t get over the fact that Hillary Clinton wasn’t elected president. The notion that I had to put what lukewarm support I had for a candidate behind her was a source of great frustration for me. I am, at my very core, someone with conservative foundations. I believe that men and women, whenever possible, should be free to live their lives without government intervention. My family and my Christian faith are the center of my life. I like my guns. Chances are, I’m better than you at using them. I’ve worked with and for the toughest most dangerous men on the planet-men you’ve read books about, men you’ve seen movies about. I’ll never claim to be one. But I’ve proven myself useful in their presence. I share this with you so you understand where and who the message I’m about to deliver comes from.

I’ve been all over this planet. And there’s a troubling observation that I’ve made on my way. It’s that mankind, when left to our own devices, does not naturally accept different people. Whether I saw Sunni and Shia in Iraq refusing to recognize the humanity of the other because of relatively nuanced differences in their common faith, or tribal warfare and genocide in sub-Saharan Africa or racial oppression and modern slavery of East Asia, the ingrained need to divide and subjugate others is ever present. In mankind’s darkest moments, the most common culprit has been that division.

For most of the last seventy thousand years, since the cognitive revolution of man drove us to organize, we’ve programmed ourselves to trust and support those that are similar to us. The result is that there have been frighteningly few societies in the history of mankind which have not been separated by either race, class or gender. Where there is one race, we make caste systems. Where lack of structure provides no castes, we subjugate gender. It’s as consistent across time and region as the number of our limbs or the shape of our organs. Fifty years ago in America, we made the first real effort, at scale, in the history of man, to change it in a society as diverse as ours. And since then, we’ve made great but imperfect progress. The work isn’t done. But we’re further than where we were 50 years ago. When we get there and make good on the promise penned by our forefathers, it will be the greatest, rarest accomplishment in our history.

On Tuesday, we took one giant leap backward on the arc of our journey to one people. And over the last four days, I’ve been bombarded by explanations of why Donald J. Trump was just elected president. I don’t need any more. I didn’t need them in the first place. I know why he was elected. He was elected because the only message that matters for the American government in 2016 is a need for change. And when the alternative to that change was someone who moved into the White House when I was fifteen, (I’m 40 now) that choice was clear for some. But it was a choice. And the ultimate choice that was made, the one people will remember a hundred years from now, was a willingness to ignore personal decency and fair treatment towards people who are different in service to that change. That was the choice that the minority of the American electorate made. That was the choice that about a quarter of eligible American voters made.

I’m not here to argue the legitimacy of the results. And I don’t get to pick and choose whether I support democracy because of the outcomes. I won’t tell you that you are a racist or a bigot if you voted for Donald Trump. I won’t even tell you that you personally are indecent. But I will tell you what you just bought with your choice. You bought a very vigilant, sensitive and loud American majority who will cry foul at the drop of a hat for anything that resembles attacks on those we have fought so hard for these last fifty years. Because what you showed us with his nomination and your vote in the election, is that you can’t be trusted to do it without us.

Many of my devout conservative friends were remarkably quiet when their candidate trashed their personal values. And they were remarkably quiet when their candidate made inexcusable first hand remarks about minorities, women and disabled Americans. And they were remarkably quiet when the dark forces of white supremacists aligned themselves in support of their candidate. I understand why. You couldn’t live with the alternative. So you rationalized out of fear that speaking up would enable it. Well, that risk is gone now. You avoided the end you couldn’t live with. That excuse is gone. And now it’s fair to say that tolerance of that behavior from here on can only be seen as an endorsement of it. So when there’s a KKK rally in North Carolina to celebrate the election of the candidate you support, you no longer have any excuse not to condemn it with the same uncompromising vigor that you condemned Hillary. Let’s see the memes. Let’s see the Facebook posts. Let’s see the outrage.

Perhaps the rest of America can trust you to hold the leader of our government to the change you so uncompromisingly sought. But we won’t trust you to look out for our fellow Americans who are different. So get ready for four years of vocal, loud, peaceful I pray, dissent. If you thought the core Trump supporters would be loud if Hillary Clinton won, what do you think is going to happen now that you’ve  marginalized a group that has much more to lose than freedom from background checks for guns and a ten percent lag in wage growth? At stake for them, is participation in our society. And if their vocal insistence on it is something you aren’t willing to tolerate, then perhaps you might consider a different path in thirty months when you get to choose your next leader without the looming evil of Hillary excusing your choice. You can’t point to her any more as cause.

If insistence on decent treatment of all Americans makes me a liberal in the eyes of conservatives, then maybe we should take some time to reflect on who our modern conservatives actually are. The world is watching.

761 replies »

  1. I cannot agree with you. There is not one reason, except perhaps, a political party that has been commandeered by wealth and power. A party that has held important legislation in stasis until the results of that non action has angered America. They have adopted every orphan minority cause, abortion, unlimited gun rights, extreme immigration laws, even to the point of ignoring the wisdom of the first amendment. Social issues that have little or no affect on our economy so that they can starve our economic distributions and simultaneously starve economic freedom for the majority of Americans.

    No, I can’t agree with you. This is not the choice of the American People… It is the driving force of greed and wont for power by a few who do not deserve it.

    Liked by 1 person

      • I agree with Mae on this one….reading Rod P. post it is hard to know if he is talking about one side or the other….but in reality it is both who have done this. I believe the author wrote a great article and was spot on. I agree that i have heard little to nothing from my friends and relatives about how they “were remarkably quiet when their candidate trashed their personal values.” The thing that is missing from the Republican/right side of things is empathy and understanding. The definition of empathy is: the ability to understand and share the feelings of another.

        The Republican congress is a perfect example of what Rod says (“A party that has held important legislation in stasis until the results of that non action has angered America”). There is neither Dem nor Republican who can say that the current congress has been inefficient (at best) and very partisan. Congress would have been fired at a normal day job from any company for their lack of efficiency and collaboration! They only want to pass laws that make their constituents happy and sew the seeds of how they view the world. They have very little empathy and in no way understand or share the feelings of the common people (who have many differing and wide base of feelings on subjects like immigration, abortion, right to die, etc.)

        Rod also shows his ignorance and lack of empathy by saying (Social issues that have little or no affect on our economy so that they can starve our economic distributions and simultaneously starve economic freedom for the majority of Americans). If Rod understood that this is HIS issue and not everyone else. How does a person say that a “social issue” has “Little or no affect” on our economy? Someones feelings, emotion, well being are all affected by that persons so called “social issue”. The top social issues of our time are typically: Abortion, Gay marriage, LGPT rights, Religious freedom, Government mandates, Gender identity, Euthanasia, Womens rights. In Rod’s response i guess only a limited number of people must deal with these social issues…..therefore they are not worthy of connection to the economy and economic distributions or well being. Huh? How does that work? Rod shows a classic sign of non empathy…he has little idea how to relate to anything but his own issues or world. This is the typical response most Dems/Liberals cant seem to figure out from their Rep/right counterparts.

        We are all one big world. My issues or focus may not be my neighbors…but at least I can empathize and sympathies with them…..create dialogue to let me understand and help them (without weighing in with my own thoughts, emotions, religious beliefs and preferences, or marginalizing their “social issue”). That is what is called listening….real listening and understanding along with empathy for our fellow humans, regardless of OUR religion, preference, or bias.

        Liked by 5 people

      • Donald Trump was never the issue. The issue was an American populace that is looking for a change of some sort. The alt-right did not like any of the establishment GOP candidates. No, most of the voters who voted for Trump are not in love with him but they disliked Trump less than they disliked the rest of the GOP candidates. What Republican voters did like was that, like them, Trump had little use for the establishment GOP.

        We saw the same thing in the Democratic race – Bernie Sanders, the outsider, was a surprisingly strong candidate against Clinton. But the Democratic Party insiders had gamed the system and Clinton lost the primary popular vote but won the primary. Sound familiar?

        The point is that there is nothing wrong with our constitution and the amendments. What’s wrong is that there is a political class, a system, a machine that includes the media, that has gamed the process and defies the will of the people. There is a political establishment, both Republican and Democratic, and voters are now heart-sick about the situation.

        The best possible outcome of this situation is that Trump’s Presidency destroys the Republican Party as we know it and Republican voters clean house. Term limits would help in this situation.

        Likewise, the Democrats need to consider the situation with ‘super delegates’ in the primaries and ask what purpose do they serve? And term limits will help ‘drain the swamp’.

        In the meantime, we would do well to try to understand the underlying aspirations of voters in order to govern better. The alt-right have seen job security, wages and benefits, and their financial futures wither in the last 20 years, going back to the Clinton Presidency and worsening with the Bush Presidency. The liberals and progressives have fought hard for American freedoms and liberties for women, gays, immigrants, and minorities. All those hard-fought American freedoms and liberties are now at risk.

        Thanks for your observations.

        Liked by 3 people

    • Wow, wow, wow. I am very much a progressive, but I know there are good people out there with conservative values. Your words are beautiful and I hope they receive the attention they merit.

      Liked by 4 people

    • First, let me offer my heartfelt thanks for your service to our great country.
      I’m a gay woman blessed with 23 years alongside the finest woman in history, and I’m afraid I don’t agree with your assessment of the nation, nor your opinions of ‘different’ people.
      Americans are generally good people and are accepting of others. I’ve felt discrimination exactly once, some drunk bum on the ‘L’ train in Chicago circa 1987 said he never fought in Korea to defend freaks like me. I didn’t recoil in shame, I didn’t file a lawsuit, I just went about my day and shrugged it off to him being an ignorant drunk bum.
      Fast forward to today, if something doesn’t go my way I do not assume it’s homophobia or sexism. If I don’t get a job I don’t assume the worst about the HR person. If I go to a restaurant and the service is terrible, I don’t assume the server is a bigot. If someone is an a-hole, I don’t assume they are that way to me because I’m gay. I just think they’re an a-hole. I don’t need protection, I don’t need therapy. I, and hopefully my fellow gay brothers & sisters, do not need to be coddled, we have fought hard since the 1960’s to defy stereotypes, despite the left’s efforts to drag us back in.

      Liked by 3 people

      • Fantastic Tracy that is the right attitude. As a conservative I can tell you there are a lot of us who have no issues with the gay community. I won’t lie to you as I know there are some who do but the majority of us are more live and let live.

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      • If it weren’t for the left, you wouldn’t have the ability to marry your partner, if you so chose. Many conservatives won’t engage in face-to-face discrimination, they support candidates who support ideas and laws to suppress us. It’s sad that you don’t see that.

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    • President Obama deported more illegals than any other president. He has been trying to be a good president and has had nothing but congressional interference. People are disgusted with Washington business as usual. And the same people who did not cooperate with our current president now have all of the control. Do you not find that just a little bit dangerous. By the way, the man you just helped vote into office has clothing businesses in all the countries he said are “killing us economically”. Any chance you would tell him he needs to set an example to all the American people. Bring those jobs back and hire Americans. He can afford it-he is very wealthy and loopholes allow him to pay no federal taxes.

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      • The notion that Obama has deported more illegals than any other president is widely believed on the Left, but simply is not true. He has fudged the numbers partly by re-defining what constitutes a deportation, including border actions that never used to be called that before, and partly by pretending that an order of deportation is the same thing as a real deportation. The order is a piece of paper, and widely ignored. The person ordered deported is still in the U.S., and is not likely to be REALLY deported even if he’s picked up for the commission of some crime.

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    • what a bunch of DRIVEL—-Trump is a BRILLIANT man who is a BILLINARE from HARD WORK!!! If you are all dumb enough to believe the bashing lies that Killary dragged up on order to cover up HER 20 SCAMS—then please JUST BE QUIET!!!! We the people have spoken—after ALL the votes were counted, he won the peoples vote as well…WE THE PEOPLE are sick of mooches and people coming into this country (who HATE US) and living off our HARD EARNED tax dollars) WE THE PEOPLE had to suffer through EIGHT years of NO CHANGE (for the good) and saw MORE MASS murders in that 8 years that in the past FIFTY ROLLED TOGETHER—–wake up and STOP WHINING!!!!!!!!!

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      • Can I ask? Do you honestly think in today’s climate, that that sort of rhetoric will change the mind and hearts of anti-Trumpers? If he is as great as you say he is, do you think your hostility helps sway our thinking? Do you think it will help unite and give hope? Your attitude is exactly what scares me, and you are the face of the Trump supporter, whether they want you or not.

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      • Nobody is doing that. And “We the People” means all the People, not just your People. Your faction, may have had their candidate win, but now he has to be everybody’s president. Have fun sucking on that for four years, zealot. You’re gonna be mighty disappointed that your boy doesn’t get to shoot off his mouth like you do now that he’s actually got a job to do that requires statesmanship, balance, and restraint.

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      • So the author of the original blog post is whining? The problem is your shallow and stereotypical assumptions about 1. We the people. You do understand Trump lost the popular vote and got fewer votes than the loser of the 2012 election. Right? No, you don’t. You understand he got 10 million votes fewer than Obama in 2008, right? No, you don’t You understand that he won the battleground states by the closest margins in history No there also. But, the electoral college, flawed as it is, remains the law of the land; ergo, Trump, despite being endorsed by a minority (that we the people you keep shouting about from the ramparts) will be our legitimate president. Legally legitimate. Whether he has the moral authority to be the leader of the free world will be debated for many years. 2. The immigrants to whom you refer want a free ride. They want to to take something from us hard working Americans. Isn’t that what you asserted? Go to the dairy farms of Idaho where these immigrants walk through blizzards to move the cattle into milking barns–go to the melon fields in the Pecos River Valley where they hunch over in 100 degree temps so you can get reasonably priced cantaloupes. Talk to farmers and see if there is any way they can feed America without immigrants — undocumented or not. 3. Trump is brilliant. No, he us an above average child of privilege who was extremely motivated to achieve success. He has attained a fair degree of success but not without his foibles like a bankruptcy here and there and myriad accusations of less than scrupulous business practices. But none of the facts pertaining to your erroneous assumptions matter, do they? Because YOU are a “real” American, aren’t you? History will provide ample fodder to prove you and those who put him into office will have plenty for which to be accountable. It won’t be “making America great again.” I was around when we became great. The author of the article hit it on the head: we have taken a huge leap backwards. Tell the majority to shut the hell up if you want, but you will be wasting your breath. And, if you are so impressed with billionaires, you should make sure you can spell the word.

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      • Since the end of WW2 and especially since the end of the cold war the elites in the western world have come under the spell of a vision of a universalist, utopian, fantasy idealizing a multi racial, multi cultural, multi lingual polyglot wherein everyone will put their arms around each other and sing cum by ya. It won’t work and the people don’t want it and never voted for it. The elites have developed a real hatred for their own people pathologizing normal feelings of in group loyalty by calling it racism, by calling normal desires for security xenophobia, by calling insistence that immigrants assimilate bigotry, The peoples reaction was and is to elect Truimp, even if , As I did, they held their nose as they did it.

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    • You are not listening or thinking. Jesus when asked what is the most important commandment replied they could all be boiled down to love your neighbor as yourself. If you disagree with Jesus, you ain’t no Christian and Trump has proven he ain’t either. Not a judgement just logic.

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    • The comments here are so wide ranging and, for the most part, so far off the mark, that it is hard to tell if we are all reading the same article. Part of it, I think, is that the author’s (Hughes) ideas are a bit unclear and disorganized, and his prose is sometimes difficult to parse. But the nut here, I believe, is this one paragraph:

      “I won’t tell you that you are a racist or a bigot if you voted for Donald Trump. I won’t even tell you that you personally are indecent. But I will tell you what you just bought with your choice. You bought a very vigilant, sensitive and loud American majority who will cry foul at the drop of a hat for anything that resembles attacks on those we have fought so hard for these last fifty years. Because what you showed us with his nomination and your vote in the election, is that you can’t be trusted to do it without us.”

      That is the essence of what he is trying to say, and I could not agree more.

      Trump ran a campaign against human decency and won. That does not mean that everyone who voted for him is indecent personally, only that something other than decency was their top priority. They sublimated lesser things — repealing Obamacare, defeating Hillary, breaking up a dysfunctional political system — and in doing so, they lost their moral compass. That is why they cannot be trusted. And that is why the rest of us — a strong, vigilant majority — will be watching, ready to hold them responsible for (and ready to respond to) any attack on the social progress we’ve made in the last half century toward a more just, tolerant society.

      The problem with Trump is not about politics. It’s not about policy. It is fundamental.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Decency would have been my top priority if a decent candidate had been one of the electable options, but to pretend that Hillary Clinton can pass a decent person’s decency test is hilarious. I at least KNOW that the candidate I voted for doesn’t pass that test. Apparently you and your “strong, vibrant majority” are too self-deluded to recognize that your candidate doesn’t pass that test either, which hardly makes you or them particularly trustworthy.

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    • The comments here are so wide ranging, it is hard to believe that we all read the same article. Part of the problem, I think, is that the author is a bit difficult to understand at times. But this one paragraph, I think, is the nut of what he has to say:

      “I won’t tell you that you are a racist or a bigot if you voted for Donald Trump. I won’t even tell you that you personally are indecent. But I will tell you what you just bought with your choice. You bought a very vigilant, sensitive and loud American majority who will cry foul at the drop of a hat for anything that resembles attacks on those we have fought so hard for these last fifty years. Because what you showed us with his nomination and your vote in the election, is that you can’t be trusted to do it without us”.

      Trump ran a campaign against human decency and won. He won not because everyone who voted for him is personally indecent, but because they sublimated lesser things — defeating Hillary, breaking up a dysfunctional political class, repealing Obamacare, etc — and in doing so, they lost their moral compass. They have shown themselves to be untrustworthy stewards of democracy. And the rest of us — literally the moral majority — will hold them accountable, ready to fight back rather than lose ground on the great gains we’ve made during the last half century toward a more tolerant and just America.

      The problem with Trump isn’t political. It isn’t about policy. It is fundamental.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Charlotte, I see what you’re saying about winning and whining… on the other hand, can you possibly stretch-out to agree that the extreme perspectives of these two sides are not the popular beliefs of the majority of the people that have voted for these two parties…i.e. that people felt obligated to vote for Hillary, even though they didn’t necessarily agree with her and that Trump has not made an effort to reach out to the real situations of persons who experience regular discrimination? Both of those things are true and we THE PEOPLE are called upon to promote the understanding of each other in opposition to the aggregation of each side, regardless of our view of the other party. In most cases it’s exaggerated, false and built up to defeat the other, not to encourage unity, but to divide us in search of their own victories..

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  2. I honestly cannot believe the sweeping false statements you make. Why are you crucifying him before he even began the job? You and the mass hysteria are the problem. Honestly, does it somehow give you a cause to fight and accuse someone for future events that have not taken place? That’s not critical thinking. That’s not thinking at all. It’s following the masses. If you can really grow up and support our democratic system and possibly hear new ways to approach the same problem then maybe, just maybe this guy has a chance. Stop whining and begin changing the world for the better with your own life.

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    • There is nothing grown up about being bigoted and a demagogue. And it is fully democratic to protest. I hope Trump faces deep resistance throughout his term from the majority he failed to persuade.

      Liked by 5 people

      • If you elimibate all the dead people and illegal aliens that voted Trump won both votes. The only reason it’s not being investigated further is because the will of the people won.

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      • I would venture to guess you don’t know any more about the real Trump other than what the hyped up bs headlines put out by the liberals said. You might learn something if you actually look deeper than the liberal talking points….he’s actually done many good works & deeds for others & has done it without fanfare in order to help others, not for self promotion.

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    • Wow! Did I imagine DT saying he wanted to punch a protester in the face, and that he would pay the legal bills of the guy who sucker-punched a Trump protester? Did I imagine him calling Mexican undocumented immigrants rapists, murderers and in some cases “good people”?
      Did I imagine him calling Rosie O’Donnel a fat pig? Was it a media lie that he has bought all his clothes sold under the Trump name from other countries, including his “Make America Great” hat?
      Get real – I’ll give him a chance, but to paraphrase Chappelle, will he give us one?

      Liked by 7 people

    • My friend, the author is doing just that, trying to change the world. Action takes many forms, protest, debate, discussion, and volunteering. Each of our attempts at changing the world are as diverse as this nation.

      Simply because ones view point does not align with yours does not mean that they have some nefarious desire to destroy our country. The bottom line is this, we have a right to insure that all people are treated with respect and dignity. We all should be equals under the law; that currently is not the case.

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      • I tried to find some quotes from Steve Bannon (from sources like the Southern Poverty Law Center or ) that would show him as a supporter of white supremacy, but came up completely dry. I found lots of sources who accused him of it, but none that actually quoted him on any topic remotely related to white supremacy. Where are the direct quotes? The only quotes on race I’ve found, for instance, simply indicate he doesn’t believe race is as great a problem in the country as some others do. If that perspective, that the impact of racism has diminished over the years rather than increased, is alone enough to make someone a ‘white supremacist’ then the definition has stretched so wide it’s going to scoop up millions of people of color along with probably a majority of whites.

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    • these statements are not nearly as false as the constant stream that has flowed from the mouth of now your president elect. iver the years i have not always agreed with the choices of presidents elected. but they all had one thing in common. they were all men of at least some moral charactor. this man is of no moral charactor and a very poor excuse for a human being at the very least. so yes i will have to accept that one quarter of this nation is so blind by fear and the complete lack of ability to think for them selves and blindly follow the bullshit fed to them. that we now have the most repulsive human being in the most powerful job in the world. thank you I hope you are satisfied with your choice in a year from now.

      Liked by 6 people

    • the reason he is #NotMyPresident.. Steve Bannon. end of story. that alone is reason enough not to support him..

      and if you support steve bannon.. you support the alt right and the nazi and kkk movement going on in the US. sorry, truth hurts.

      Liked by 6 people

    • He’s not criticizing him. He’s criticizing people like you. Your comment proves his point well. Are you scared if you admit intolerant people such as yourself exist, they won’t let Trump serve as president? They will, and things would get better for everyone, unless you’re a bigot. Fix yourself.

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    • Okay, he has basically begun the job——his transition team and others. In five minutes we know what kind of person he is (as if we didn’t already know). Aren’t you judged by what you have said over and over ad infinitum??? Oh, well, he really didn’t mean it. Evidently he did because he has now appointed Steve Bannon.

      Liked by 5 people

    • This is what the author wrote three days earlier, before he decided that Trump and the people who voted for him won’t treat people decently… There’s one other thing worth noting though. For the first time in my life, Donald J. Trump and I are on the same team. And I don’t know what to do with that other than hope like hell that he’s the best God damn president of my lifetime. Because there were dark and frightening powers that helped this come together for our new president elect. But there were also good and decent people who believed that this was their best option to drive change in our political process. And the only way that we get through this in one piece is for those good and decent people to help hold our new leader accountable for delivering on what they saw in his message-a change for the better from the political status quo.

      Democracy…warts and all.

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    • I can’t speak for the author. My protestations are simply for all of you trumpers to hear. We are half the country, please feel our footsteps. We are coming in the future. Trump voters fired the first shot. We’ll fire the next one.

      Liked by 3 people

      • “Trump voters fired the first shot. We’ll fire the next one”? So much hate.

        I voted for Trump and all my ammunition is still accounted for – none, zero, zilch expended rounds.

        (Do you actually HAVE any ammunition? Just curious.)

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  3. Well written, Let’s see what we get for change. Every demagogue has gained the throne in the same way. We can only hope that he doesn’t practice what he preaches. We’ve elected the equivalent of a teen-age boy who threatens to sue his parents for child abuse when they try to discipline him.

    Liked by 5 people

  4. We’re in a real pickle for sure!

    I don’t disagree with anything that was said there, but I also see this..

    We (some of us) are very lucky to live in places like California and New York where the prosperity has fostered the growth of wonderfully culturally and ethnically diverse communities. While our deepest desire and intention is to expand that bubble of love and inclusion to the rest of the country and world, we cannot accomplish this by forcing our message down the throats of people whose experiences have been in 100% diametric opposition of our own. Where a dismal job market has caused poverty and loss on a mass scale and along with it, blame, bitterness and racial tension. We cannot tell those people that their problems are not real and instead try to convince them that the issue of “same sex bathrooms” (even though I support this) or bringing Syrian refugees into the country should be more important to them than the health and well-being of their own children and families. Not that these issues should be abandoned NO!, but they should be addressed with a sense of compassion to the people who rightfully do not understand their value. Not by shouting that they’re hateful for their beliefs, but that we understand that they’re hard pressed to embrace it at the moment and we’ll do our best to hear their perspective. Does a “basket of deplorables” exist out there? YES for sure. It is a scary thought, but firstly, they are not the majority, and secondly, does that statement itself not invigorate that sense of polarization and frustration that we are supposed to be fighting to defeat with that “Clinton” message inclusiveness and tolerance? Does it not represent it’s own sense of hypocrisy? I’m not encouraging the acceptance of racist, misogynistic thinking AT ALL. I’m saying that the message they’ve been told, “your white so you are not allowed to complain about anything” is part of the ACTUAL CAUSE of the proliferation of racism in communities impoverished and divided. Let’s take some responsibility for that.

    If we cannot put ourselves in their shoes for one moment and genuinely try to empathize with the reasons that our priorities are different than we are at a grave loss and will have little hope of extending that bubble even a little, instead we’ll probably shrink it….

    Many of the practical solutions to those problems have been completely abandoned by the federal government. These people feel they have been abandoned and have had no voice. Worse they have had terrible slurs hurled at them for daring to voice their concerns, called mostly uneducated racists and disregarded completely. Let’s take a moment to own some responsibility for the wide spread promotion of THAT hate coming from our own side..

    With respect and genuine understanding of both sides.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Written in a typical elitist vocabulary. We who are richer, more culturally “correct ,” more intelligent, must have compassion on those poor souls who do not live in the Northeast or on the West Coast. Being somewhat deprived because of their unfortunate location, they cannot be expected to understand complex issues. WE must educate the poor, miserable, misguided folk who “cling to their guns and their religion.”. That is exactly the attitude that caused Hillary to lose in the entire center of the country. The author of this article mentions the failings of only one candidate and his voters. He forgets that Democrats worshipped at the feet of a former KKK grand wizard, Robert Byrd, and that Hillary marginalized millions of Americans by calling them deplorable and unredeemable. Her “inclusion” of some ethnic groups mainly happens at election time when she shows up to campaign in worship services.

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      • And since I think you missed the point he was making with the “woe is me victim of the liberal elite” act, what he was talking about was that those who lived in areas where policies of globalization have fostered more prosperity (California, New York, other urban areas), need to make a better effort to understand how the same policies of globalization have had negative impacts on other areas of the nation rather than focusing political energy on trying to convince other parts of the nation that same sex bathrooms and syrian refugees are the big problems we need to be solving.

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      • I’m so sorry my comments came off that way. If it helps to clear the air I’m a licensed gun owner and I proudly voted for Trump. I guess I thought that tone would appeal to the people I was trying to reach out to. It was not meant to be condescending. I apologize. I do feel like a traitor in my own state, living in CA and I’m desperate to get people to understand the other side. That’s all.

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      • I’m so sorry my comments came off that way. If it helps to clear the air I’m a licensed gun owner and I proudly voted for Trump. I guess I thought that tone would appeal to the people I was trying to reach out to. It was not meant to be condescending. I apologize. I do feel like a traitor in my own state, living in CA and I’m desperate to get people to understand the other side. That’s all.

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      • Rebecca, I am sorry you feel that the comment before was elitist. That is not what I read. What I read was, “When there is the struggle for basics – bills, schools etc. it is difficult to prioritize saving the world.”
        I for one have realized that we in California live in a bubble, and I as your people – American – have not been good neighbors. For that I am sorry.
        I also believe that the results of democratic process should be respected. I am also, very scared for me and my child – there is a lot of hate built up against people of color, I am Indian, I am brown. I left India in the hope of not being marginalized because I am female. I am American now, and it scares me that I will be marginalized for being female, for being brown, for being an immigrant, for being in America.

        I feel that a conversation is needed, between us to truly build the country we both want. It is not about Trump or Hillary it about people like us, the people who want to feel safe, put food on the table, feel like a part of the country we have all made our home.

        I hope we can talk, and find ways to support each other. I imagine we will find a lot of common ground.

        Liked by 1 person

    • With all due respect…you are right and wrong. Of course these people should be looked at with dignity and respect and understanding of their plight. However, their plight is no more difficult, and bluntly, as a group, less difficult than other groups like blacks and Hispanics. Black people have had these same types of problems FOR YEARS and were literally told it was our fault. There was no empathy as a nation for the very same issues.

      So no, please do not ask me to feel any more sympathy for white working class people who bluntly told me and mine to pull yourself up and stop asking for handouts, behave better and you won’t be shot. They need to buck up and start taking it just like the rest of us. When there is some humility from the nation concerning all people of color, then perhaps there can be some better understanding and empathy for white working class people as well. When we are all in it together, then perhaps we can all be I but together.

      Liked by 5 people

      • No, your right. And I’m not saying that we should abandon any of our important causes in defense of African American, minority and LGBTQ populations. I’m just saying in a really long winded way I guess. That understanding breeds compassion and blame breeds anger and violence. On both sides. Maybe some of us deserve it more than others, but focusing on that is not going to help anyone…

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  5. You claim that a minority of 1/4 put us in this place when only a minority of 1/4 of our democratic voters showed up. Maybe it is the 1/2 of the qualified voters that did not show up to the polls are the ones at fault who we now have in office. It is the silent majority that did not vote who in the end will be the most hurt.

    Liked by 1 person

    • True, Nora, except it was the right that closed polling places, shortened early voting, added voter ID restrictions, made sure there were bigly long lines, and did most of this in areas that traditionally vote blue.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Why shouldn’t we have to produce proof that we are part of the voting population? Early voting should be allowed with valid reason and then double checked to assure that that vote isn’t again placed on Election Day. As for early closing in this time of technology it still went into 1 in the morning to get results. How late should polls be open? 8pm seems fair 13 hours of voting time should allow all shifts that truly want to vote the opportunity. if you don’t believe that voter fraud has been perpetrated by both sides you are naive, but historically the Democratic Party has found new an unique ways to get votes from dead people voting this year in Philadelphia to early voting and then going to the poles also.

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  6. A point I could not find in these comments was that only about 50% of eligible voters actually voted! Does this mean that half the population does not care who is in power? For those who are demonstrating, every one of them should answer the question “Did you vote?”. I thought that with a campaign this controversial, there would be a much greater voter turnout.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Mr Hughes, you have excellent insights & express reality so clearly.

    THANK YOU

    Those who are not accepting of your views do not understand the rights & desires our founders of our constitution & government, world history or how a true democracy (not political ideologies) fails.

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  8. It’s pretty clear why Trump won the election, you just have to read through his tax plan and understand his unwavering promise to deregulate Wall Street, ridding them of the constraints of the Dodd- Frank Act, Consumer Protection agency, and the EPA. Trump is the new Reagan, who will pass massive tax cuts for businesses and for the wealthy. He will unleash Wall Street even further, allowing them to play again without any rules. Trump is a much better friend to the Big banks then Hillary Clinton could ever have been, with liberal Democrats wanting to reform the”Too big to fail” Banking system. The big banks could never let that happen, and when the economy crashes again, after Wall Street is done playing with millions of American lives, a Democrat will be elected to clean up their mess…. again. And this time the economy will become Trump’s mess, just like it was G.W. Bush’s mess and before that
    Reagan’s mess.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Sandra thank you for re explaining the history of the Republicon busts over the decades and how the Democrats always win to rescue us out of the Ditch . But the energy expended getting the car out of the Ditch is draining and little is left for addressing all the other needed social and cultural things and as well as improvements to our economy so the failure will not happen again.

      The fickled american voter who is not engaged at the needed levels suffers from Amnesia. So they dont appreciate the good things the DEMs did for them so they flip and vote another CON man into office who goes about re breaking all the China in the Kitchen! This seems to be our cycle in the states!

      Perhaps the Democratic Party will reject Neo Liberalism and DLc republicon lite and reclaim their original Soul and rebuild a better more balanced for all workers party that includes a place for everyone. The uncontrolled capitalist market economy is running out of gas for all of us we need structural change.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I think about how Trump is being associated with the KKK often. I think it is because something doesn’t add up for me, like many of the labels thrown at Trump. I have been weary of him since he started his bid, something about him I just instinctively don’t fully trust. And it has nothing to do with everything said about him because I believe everything he has said, while not exactly poignant, has been twisted by the media who was openly campaigning for Hillary. People will argue that they were his own words, but, in all fairness, we have seen many times how even videos of someone’s own words can be taken out of context. And we have also seen many times how two people can say the same thing, but can be treated differently for them. That is the power of the media. The thing that gets me about the KKK association is this- the KKK unfortunately exists, that is a fact. They are made up of real people who hide among us. Because they are real, they vote. Logic dictates then that since they vote, this can’t be the first time that they came out and supported a candidate. I would have to think, in fact I know they have done this before publicly. Why then all of a sudden is their support so scrutinized? I understand it took Trump a day to repudiate their support, but he did do it. And since then, his team has done so several times and made it clear they are not interested in it. Yet, the association has stuck. I guess for me the reason I don’t buy it is because there has been an attempt, which I find untrue, to brand Trump supporters as white, uneducated racists, and what better way to support those claims than to link an association with the biggest group of racists.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I may not agree with everything said in this thread but I agree that only half of our voting population voted and that those who did wanted change.
    Here is what I got out of Tuesday’s message.
    Some people talk about love and tolerance but don’t live it. The media drives a majority of our population and most of tha majority will believe whatever it’s told.
    President Obama has done some good things but has done more to divide our country racially than Trump could ever do. I believe we need affordable healthcare I believe that how you live your life is your business and none of mine. I believe that attempts to legislate morality rarely work.
    I also believe that women should be treated equally and that for the most part they have been an intricate part of our country’s history and will be even more so in its future.
    All that said I saw nothing of value in Hillary and not much more in Trump.
    The best thing that could have happened would have been that the Libaterian party got 5% of the vote and would have been recognized as a valid party complete with funding. It would have been a third option. I do not believe Gary Johnson was the answer but that doesn’t mean that his ideas were that far off base. To many times we are forced to choose right or left when a majority fall in the middle.
    I am willing to give Trump a chance and I don’t believe we to a step backward he is full of bluster but he will not build a wall he will not repeal Obamacare totally and he will not force women into the kitchen barefoot and pregnant.
    He has traditionally given women jobs of importance in his company because as a businessman he knows you put the person you can get in charge regardless of their age, sex, color or sexual preference.
    I did not vote for him but he is my President and as such we must support him and make him and congress aware that times are changing.
    Trump wants term limits which is great instead of whining because he won call your local representative and tell him you want it to.
    If that is the only thing that he gets done in four years it’s a win for the American people.

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  11. Profoundly disagree on many key points. Not all were quiet. Many objected. It was not out of fear that I supported Trump. It was that after 8 years I had no desire for a 3rd term – or a corrupt politician in charge. It’s pretty rude to tag good people with what you’re tagging us with. What about the rhetoric and scaremongering from the HRC campaign? It distilled to slamming Trump and being rude to those who didn’t get the PC memo. Or POTUS telling us the world would end if HRC didn’t win. Really? Right now, the world is watching these demos – this is loyal opposition? Try again. It’s infantile. I’d respect you more if de minimus you waited until the guy actually is in power. I’m horrified as I’m watching the Balkanization of a country I love and served. Overseas. My son’s Hispanic by the way – and he had NO problem with this rhetoric. Mostly because he’s wise enough to discern the message and not personalize. Unlike many – including his mother.

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  12. First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—
    Because I was not a Socialist.

    Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out—
    Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

    Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
    Because I was not a Jew.

    Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

    Liked by 4 people

  13. Both the article and the comments make a fascinating read. I’m English and I don’t think I’ve encountered a single English person who feels ‘positive’ about what Trump will represent and instigate (aside from Nigel Farage who has some very unpleasant views). I also urge those of you who are ‘proud of your guns’ to really ask yourself, why? Proud – what a strange word.

    Liked by 3 people

      • For what purpose, so England could reclaim us? Why are you proud of your guns? Are you “Proud” that “no soldier, in time of peace, be quartered in any house without the consent of the owner.” Amend.3. How “Proud” are you about “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude… shall exist within the United States” Amend 13. Or how about this one, “The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes” Amend. 16. Here’s one I’m sure you love “No law varying the compensation for the services of the Senators or Representatives shall take effect, until an election of Representatives shall have intervened.” Amend. 27

        If you love the Constitution, as most guns rights peoples cry that they do, then you are obviously “Proud” of the entire document. Do you know how many Amendments there are to the Constitution? You realize of course that an amendment means a change right? Anything that was changed once can be changed again (look at the 18th Amendment, and continue drinking your beer). The Constitution has changed over the years to reflect the will of the people as well as to address wrongs (13th Amendment). Instead of saying you’re proud of your guns, maybe you should be proud that people, most of them smarter than you or me, felt that as a living document, the Constitution had to be tweaked occasionally.

        Be proud of your rights, be proud of your government (they are doing a job you or I don’t want to do), be proud of the freedoms we all enjoy in America, but please don’t say you’re proud of something that can cause so much division and misunderstanding among people. And as a full disclosure, I own several guns. I’m not “proud” of them, I’m proud of my family, I’m proud of my country (usually) and I’m proud we can have a voice.

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    • Here’s an attempt to answer without excusing the horrible gun violence that has occurred here in the USA. 98% of gun violence in America happens in inner cities riddled with gang and drug related activities. There are so so so many innocent victims in this environment, which is inexcusable!!! And should be addressed with vigor, but the 2% of that violence that occurs in those red states we see so clearly on the election map, don’t see the logic in taking away their long standing traditions of hunting and their 2nd amendment right to defend themselves in a stance where tradition and defense are integral parts of life, liberty and freedom.

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  14. Thoughtful, but I had a hard time following where you were going. I see blame on both sides, refusal to compromise. However, I fail to see how any sensible human being can defend Trump. I get how he was elected, but really he and his party are indefensible….

    Liked by 3 people

  15. Does it matter at this point if Trump is sexist and racist? He has appointed a man (Bannon) who has clearly printed his intent to do everything possible to take away the rights of blacks, hispanics, Muslims, and jews. And does that matter? If we find such declared racist or sexist intentions or expressions unacceptable, we should stand up and be counted that such behavior isn’t acceptable–if you really believe the Founding Fathers of this representative Republic. I happen to think the longer term outcomes of this election in both the fractured foundations of the country and the efforts to regress our international engagement will create a financial crises that will come to our shores in unattractive ways. When all of these seeds of hate that have been planted in this election grow, no one will like the outcomes.

    Liked by 4 people

  16. Brilliantly written but perhaps too intelligent and well-reasoned for many to grasp. The attention span for good arguments these days seems to be limited to sound bites. I luve in NC so when KKK announced on Nov. 10th that they would be marching to celebrate I took note that it was the the anniversary of the 1898 Wilmington massacre. Only Cout d’etat in American History. Fueled by white supremecy. We need to watch closely.
    Thank you for sharing your thoughts. I’m with you.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Oh, my, I wasn’t aware of the significance of the date chosen my the KKK. Thank you for that information. I agree, too, that not everyone will grasp the author’s argument. It’s not that readers’ aren’t intelligent. However, an important rule of composition is to not put too many ideas/details/stances in one sentence because many readers choose not to read all of it.

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  17. Very well written. So many thoughts about “why?” have occurred to me, and refusal to stop and consider points of view of those other than one’s self, or intolerance for those different than one’s self, could well be one of the big answers.

    In this country, we have the vast privilege of being insulated from war, strife, pandemic disease and the type of grinding, endemic poverty so prevalent in so much of the world. I believe has allowed us to focus on social progress.

    Our insulation turns out to be a very sharp double-edged sword; lacking understanding of how good we have it, it’s only too easy to make irresponsible choices based on differences, which when examined closely, should truly be trivial.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. QUESTION: I would love to use your last statement in a quote (I do graphic design) and can send you a pic of what I have in mind for your review before I would use it to post on Facebook. Please let me know . . . that statement reflects my heart so well!

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  19. I hope Mr. Hughes is correct that… “You bought a very vigilant, sensitive and loud American majority who will cry foul at the drop of a hat for anything that resembles attacks on those we have fought so hard for these last fifty years.”

    History shows that a populace which is not in a democratic mood can suppress opposition through intimidation, misinformation and other means. Bannon and Roger Stone are two of the best in the business at that. Time will tell whether free speech can prevail.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. My issue with this article is that he gives too much credence to the thought that people wanted change, and not enough credence to what kind of change.

    Change for the sake of change would mean that the House/Senate incumbents would have changed. That didn’t happen. Change at the presidential level on ideology could have happened with 15 other Republican candidates. Change from a Washington insider could have happened with Ben Carson. He’s a world renowned neurosurgeon. People didn’t want any of that change. They wanted the Donald Trump change. What did Donald Trump promise/promote that the other guys didn’t?

    The dismissal of what Trump proposed, and rationalization that people voted change for changes’ sake loses water by the deafening silence on Reince Prebus’ appointment and the saturation of lobbyists on the Trump team. If you wanted change, you should be upset when nothing changes. That only leaves the denigration and demonization of minorities as Trump’s selling point. If people say that’s not why they bought him, then I should see an outcry over Steve Bannon from Trump supporters. I don’t. “If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor.”

    Liked by 3 people

  21. Yes, you are right. You’ve described mankind. But not woman kind and not humankind. Mankind. And until men come to recognize they are half of a whole (and thankfully many men do) and half of the problem, we will not evolve into humankind.

    Liked by 3 people

  22. http://www.maddogslair.com/blog/i-did-not-find-much-in-his-post-to-redeem-it

    “The result is that there have been frighteningly few societies in the history of mankind which have not been separated by either race, class or gender.” This is simply historically wrong. Rome is a fine example of the opposite. And it is not alone.

    “Fifty years ago in America, we made the first real effort, at scale, in the history of man, to change it in a society as diverse as ours.” This is just historical illiteracy. The Roman, the British, the American systems prior to 50 years ago all made real efforts, at scale, in the manner he says they did not. He seems to have read Zinn’s history of America, perhaps he should have read:

    The Roman Empire, Economy, Society, and Culture, by Peter Gurney & Richard Saller, among other books.

    The American experience was tainted by slavery, but this was only because the various states needed to be united or fail, the Southern states relied upon a slavery driven economic system, and the North had the choice of either allowing slavery, or remaining enslaved to the British. This issue was not resolved 50 years ago, but during the 1860s. Nor was suffrage addressed 50 years ago, but during the second decade of the 20th century for the nation as a whole, and much earlier in many of the states. What happened 50 years ago was at best a nominal change, with much of the change being little more than a rolling disaster for blacks/coloreds, and women. Welfare has destroyed the low income black/colored/white family, and women entering the workforce, far from panacea, has left women unhappy, harried, and frustrated.

    “On Tuesday, we took one giant leap backward on the arc of our journey to one people. And over the last four days, I’ve been bombarded by explanations of why Donald J. Trump was just elected president. I don’t need any more. I didn’t need them in the first place. I know why he was elected. He was elected because the only message that matters for the American government in 2016 is a need for change. And when the alternative to that change was someone who moved into the White House when I was fifteen, (I’m 40 now) that choice was clear for some. But it was a choice. And the ultimate choice that was made, the one people will remember a hundred years from now, was a willingness to ignore personal decency and fair treatment towards people who are different in service to that change.”

    It is interesting that he already knows the trajectory, and outcome of the Trump Presidency although Trump has yet to take office, name Cabinet members, or begin pursuing a policy agenda. For all of his protestations of independence, and lack of political/ideological adherence to Hillary/progressivism, what else could account for this? Humorously, Trump has already indicated he will appoint a gay man to the highest post an “out” gay man has ever been appointed. I expect he will follow suit with other appointments which will erode this authors points, but none of that will likely alter his opinion.

    ” . . . [W]hat you showed us with his nomination and your vote in the election, is that you can’t be trusted to do it without us.” In the end, the authoritarian always shows his true colors. None but those opinions he approves can be trusted. The other is never sufficiently adult. This is a petty tantrum, being thrown in a petty manner, by a petty man, about a petty issue. Fine. But there is no adult here. He is a child wearing his parents clothing, cute, precocious, but a child nonetheless.

    “Many of my devout conservative friends were remarkably quiet when their candidate trashed their personal values. And they were remarkably quiet when their candidate made inexcusable first hand remarks about minorities, women and disabled Americans. And they were remarkably quiet when the dark forces of white supremacists aligned themselves in support of their candidate.”

    Anecdotal evidence is always perfect because it is indisputable, I cannot argue these points as I do not know his “friends,” no matter how apocryphal. The last sentence is simply infantilized reasoning. Whether a KKK member claims agreement with Trump, or a violent, homicidal communist claims agreement with Clinton neither deserves to be tarred with the odious beliefs of that individual. The left has long played a game of claiming the ability to tar the right with all manner of such slime, yet as we see with this election it is always the left, and the left supporters who are violent, attacking Trump supporters myriad times during the campaign, and now acting violently during the post election. The left’s bogeymen ginned up for the right never seem to materialize. Even more odious, is the fact that these bogeymen are nearly always conjured from the historical past, a past where the KKK was actually the militant wing of the Democrat party in the South, where the murderous actuality was done in the name of the Democrats not Republicans. I suspect this author knows nothing of these truths, nor would he care.

    The authoritarian urge is strong in this author, it is reflected in American progressivism, which is simply the American run at socialism, but because Americans are uncomfortable with authoritarianism, it is less so than British socialism, European socialism, or the true horror show of East European/Asian socialism, with its 100 million corpses. He may want to tell the rest of the nation how to behave but this election was essentially the rest of the nation telling people like him to F@#$ off.

    ” So when there’s a KKK rally in North Carolina to celebrate the election of the candidate you support, you no longer have any excuse not to condemn it with the same uncompromising vigor that you condemned Hillary. Let’s see the memes. Let’s see the Facebook posts. Let’s see the outrage.”

    I have never met a conservative, and I am not and never have been one, who does not denounce the KKK, antisemitism, racism, etc. Sorry, this is a strawman argument. Perhaps they do exist, but they must be rare if one never encounters them.

    On the other hand, where have Hillary, or Obama, or Biden, or the DNC been while the anti-Trump protestors destroy millions of dollars in property, disrupt businesses, injure, and maim? These are people acting in the name of these people, in the name of the Democrat party, in the name of liberalism, and progressivism. Perhaps Hillary, and Obama should speak out regarding these actions? Just saying.

    “Perhaps the rest of America can trust you to hold the leader of our government to the change you so uncompromisingly sought. But we won’t trust you to look out for our fellow Americans who are different. So get ready for four years of vocal, loud, peaceful I pray, dissent. If you thought the core Trump supporters would be loud if Hillary Clinton won, what do you think is going to happen now that you’ve marginalized a group that has much more to lose than freedom from background checks for guns and a ten percent lag in wage growth?”

    Again, for a man without ideology he is quite ginned up about exactly nothing. Trump has not acted, this is one man loudly counting his chickens before they are even layed eggs, let alone hatched. And exactly what has this group he so loudly brays about to lose? Saying they have something to lose is not the same as providing some evidence of actual loss, or even actual potential loss. The left, and this author is of the left, has a long and storied history of crying wolf. We have seen throughout this election cycle person after person coming forward to make claims of loss, only to find that the crimes, and loss they claim never happened. These are the antics of the left, they no longer hold much sway, the rest of us are disinclined to believe these pettifoggers, liars, and cheats.

    He ends with perhaps the most appalling strawman ever. “If insistence on decent treatment of all Americans makes me a liberal in the eyes of conservatives, then maybe we should take some time to reflect on who our modern conservatives actually are. The world is watching.” Oh Jesus, wrap yourself in the flag, bang a drum, shoot a rocket out your ass, you beclown yourself you little prat. You do not insist on decent treatment for “all Americans.” To the contrary you and your ilk insist on special treatment for you, and your fellow travelers.

    Not being a conservative, but a classical liberal, I don’t feel any need to reflect on what modern conservatives actually are. I do feel compelled to hold conservatives, and progressives/liberals like this authors feet to the fire.

    My thoughts on Trump have been mixed, but less so since the election. The actions of the progressives after the election show they are incapable of behaving responsibly, and are unwilling to rein in their more violent elements, of which they have myriad. They deserve less say in the political sphere until they can come to grips with this. I do strongly believe that the American two party system needs two strong parties to suss out policies, before they are written into law, nothing reinforces this more than the disaster that is Obamacare, the 8 years of disastrous Obama domestic economic policies, and even more catastrophic Obama foreign policies. Millions have died not because Obama is the prat he is, but because the two party system was stymied, and the Republicans were incapable of countering Democrat party excesses. It was not until 2012 that the voters were able to rectify the congressional imbalance, and reassert two party give and take regarding policies. The result was Obama simply moved to an Emperor model of the Presidency, and using the executive order to thwart the two party system. Unsurprisingly, the voters balked, and sought change.

    The two party system restored, middle America will expect Trump to run the nation from a Republican position, but with the advice and consent of the Democrat party. If he fails, he will have to pay for that, but if the Democrats fail, it will be they who pay.

    I stand ready to point out Trumps failings, but only after he has acted. I did the same with President Obama, waiting until he acted like a lunatic progressive before holding him to task for those beliefs. Prejudging the actions of an individual is, well, prejudice, and a very negative form to boot. But authoritarians will always out, as this one has.

    Clearly, the left, the progressives, the Democrats need their 40 years in the wilderness to sort out these issues, and have their come to Jesus. Make it snappy, please, we need a two party system in functional working order, and it does not appear that the other parties are capable of taking over the reins at this time.

    Mark Sherman

    Liked by 1 person

  23. [quote]On Tuesday, we took one giant leap backward on the arc of our journey to one people.[/quote]

    No. What we had was a correction. Under Bush we’d swung WAY far to the right. Under Obama we swung WAY far to the left. This is the correction. It’s normal. It’s like a pendulum. With each swing it comes a bit closer to a central position. Unfortunately those one either end aren’t happy with the center, but in order to live and work together that center position will be the only way we can survive.

    [quote]He was elected because the only message that matters for the American government in 2016 is a need for change.[/quote]

    See: Obama, Barack “Hope and Change” 2008

    [quote] I won’t tell you that you are a racist or a bigot if you voted for Donald Trump. I won’t even tell you that you personally are indecent.[/quote]

    Thank you. And I won’t try to explain to you that this, ultimately, was a response to the racism and bigotry and indecency from your side of the argument. Carry on.

    [quote]Because what you showed us with his nomination and your vote in the election, is that you can’t be trusted to do it without us.[/quote]

    And that goes both ways. You’ve shown us over recent history that you are willing to scream down or physically attack anyone or anything you don’t agree with. True freedom of speech means nothing to you. No one wants to do it without you but you need to give ALL sides a voice.

    [quote]So when there’s a KKK rally in North Carolina to celebrate the election of the candidate you support, you no longer have any excuse not to condemn it with the same uncompromising vigor that you condemned Hillary.[/quote]

    It’s in Pelham, NC. The county population is roughly 23000 people. How many do you honestly think will show up? 250, maybe? Roughly 1%? Of one county? How exactly does the KKK endorsing someone make any difference in 2016? The total membership of the Klan in the US is less than 10000. Some sources say about 5000. More people believe that the Lizard People run the world. The Klan is irrelevant. And, just as a side note, I’d venture to guess that Black Lives Matter has caused more personal and physical damage in this country in the last 2 years than the Klan has in the past 50. And, the founders and most famous members of the Klan were Democrats. Just saying.

    And please note, this is NOT the same as Trump endorsing the KKK. I’ve seen no statements from Trump endorsing the Klan. His so-called “racist” statements are nothing of the sort if you actually go and research them and critically think about what he’s saying instead of listening to and taking the media at face value.

    [quote]At stake for them, is participation in our society. And if their vocal insistence on it is something you aren’t willing to tolerate, then perhaps you might consider a different path in thirty months when you get to choose your next leader without the looming evil of Hillary excusing your choice. [/quote]

    The backlash against any attempt to roll back civil rights in the is country would be so immediate, and so dangerous that it would be suicidal for anyone to try. Anything in that line STILL has to run through Congress, and they are desperate to hold on to their jobs. So that’s a worry that’s ridiculous on it’s face, for purely pragmatic reasons.

    In a supposedly free and democratic society you simply CANNOT scream epithets and invective at the other side, completely marginalizing and demonizing a large swath of the population in the process and NOT expect pushback. WE HAVE ALL GOT TO WORK TOGETHER! Screaming “HE’S NOT MY PRESIDENT” and destroying property is not the way to go about it.

    Hillary Clinton was, without a doubt, the worst candidate the Democrats could have chosen. Trump was the worst candidate the Republicans could have chosen. ANY Republican could have won this election. Trump proves that. This was a vote against Hillary and against the loud, aggressive and elitist dogma being spewed by the far left in this country. By all means, be loud. Stand up for your beliefs. That’s the entire purpose of the first amendment. But please, PLEASE remember that not everyone shares your beliefs. Now, is the left willing to listen, compromise and find a middle ground that everyone can live with or will you continue to stand in the middle of the playground with your fingers in your ears, shouting epithets? Time will tell.

    Like

  24. The author makes it sound like racial harmony was great under Obama and Trump got elected and ruined everything. That is completely false. In fact, racial relations got worse under Obama under every poll. Even African Americans said it got worse. Part of the problem was Obama wading into racial issues like the black Ivy League Professor and Trayvon Martin. He would assume the white person was guilty without knowing any of the facts of the case. Then Obama said things like “Trayvon Martin could have been my son” meant to incite people and drive them into rage. And he put people in office like Eric Holder, who many felt would only prosecute a case if it was a white defendant and a black accuser.

    The other thing the author ignores is just how unethical of a candidate Hillary Clinton was. If her emails went to 5 foreign intelligence agencies, she put us all in danger over her personal ambition. The pay to play with The Clinton Foundation is sickening. She has her own history of questionable remarks against African Americans and made an ethnic slur against a Jewish campaign worker. She called 25% of the country deplorables. My point is, these were 2 seriously flawed candidates so it’s not like the alternative to Trump was any better.

    Like

  25. Dump is a fool and a menace to society and must be made impotent. The delusional right is now seeing the full fury of America’s refusal to march lockstep into a totalitarian government,

    Liked by 2 people

    • Or we’re seeing the full fury of a toddler deprived of its binky.

      No need to worry that people who opposed the KKK, the anarchists, the Soviets, the Nazis, the Castroites, the Maoists, etc., are going to usher in a totalitarian government. Trump’s biggest selling point for many of us was that he promised to appoint non-totalitarians to the Supreme Court, something that Hillary was absolutely NOT on board with. But hey, if you want to join us in opposing totalitarian government and can stop worrying about your binky, it’s all good.

      Like

  26. I fear a lot of people reading this are missing the point that racism and fear of ‘the other’ and the violence and subjugation that results from it is a deep human impulse that is at the root of most of today’s problems across the world and it’s something that needs to be stamped out in ourselves and all around us as our highest priority. Tolerance of Trump’s views in the name of change is a giant leap away from that.
    You’ve stated it so eloquently and I thank you. I’ve been trying to find a way to say it to my kids and you’ve helped me immensely.

    Liked by 2 people

  27. As a Canadian, I feel it necessary to let you know that one year ago, we voted for inclusivity of all. Our new government has produced a cabinet filled with people of all races and creeds and a 50/50 split in gender. I am proud of the directions we have taken and fear the American example will start to trickle across our border and destroy what we continue to work diligently for – equality for all!

    Liked by 4 people

  28. Reblogged this on Scotties Toy Box and commented:
    I thank Nan for sending me the link for this post. It is well written and well thought out. It says what we need people to say, that is that they won’t let others be treated unfairly , they won’t discrimination become the accepted normal. All people need to stand up for the rights and progress we have made. I am reminded though that a lot of the votes from the Christian right came from people who wanted more rights for themselves, at the expense of LGBTQ people. Trump got a lot of votes from groups who voted to restrict the rights and equal treatment of other people in the country. That scares the spit out of me. I will wait to see how many people will stand up now for others. I am not hopeful of them doing it. Hugs

    Liked by 2 people

  29. It may just be that Trump has no idea what he has embarked on. Or in some twisted way he does. I keep saying this is not a triumph for GOP. Look at who he is selected. No no our country is about to change in the most significant way. I saw this calm man talking to reporters with Obama – all a farce when I later saw what he intends to do in 100 days. I daresay illegals need to be deported. I have watched a small store take the link card from a couple picking up the red phone for Western Union. The only way they would have “cash” on that card is for children born here no other way. Now with that also comes the knowledge that for some in certain areas they must send money back to keep their families safe but aduh all the right reasons to come the right way to America. I am quite aware that people are suffering all over the world, I get it. But we have problems we can no longer keep brushing aside. I am afraid SSI will be cut for my son who is still in a training program. I am afraid hat next year the big ticket was healthcare yet I have heard nothing about options for care. Seven Thousand Dollars for myself when only making maybe 20k. I can’t afford the cash payments so I have to sign for something that is taken from my check. I have my Masters! making 9.50 an hour. I don’t think people truly knew what they were voting for because of all the slanderous game playing news about Clinton which was typically false. Something is coming – coming from my heart I believe this – something our generations have never seen first hand but we are about to in a big way. I noticed nothing about God was said, can this many people ( the voters for Trump) honestly not see it? Supposed people of God and Good Values? Hillary didn’t want to take you bloody guns she just wanted a central database. And to be honest they have shown a 14 year old without ID walk out of a show with an assault rifle. now that is scarier than anything. No wonder thugs on the streets have guns. If you want to have guns great but when you sell them….? I don’t support abortion but I am pro-choice I would have rather seen more counselling and fricking parents teaching their kids how to live right. When I had my son I had counselling first because I was doing it on my own.

    Something Wicked this way Comes………..

    Liked by 3 people

    • I believe that sentencing young men who created the sperm that impregnated an egg to be a solution for less abortions! What if that happened? What if a man had to go to jail for the months a woman was pregnant because they had not protected the woman from an unplanned pregnancy? Do you think men might be more careful? And no, paying child support isn’t enough. The women pay child support too. The way to end abortions is to end sperm reaching an egg.

      Like

  30. I was raised a Democrat. Forty years ago the Democratic Party was the “hero” of he middle working class o society. At the time he saying was: “I don’t belong to any organized political party. I am a Democrat.” THIS IS NOT TRUE TODAY. THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY HAS BEEN TAKEN OVER BY THE SO CALLED LIBERAL ELITE AND COULD NOT CARE LESS ABOUT THE WORKING MIDDLE CLASS. HILLARY WAS A CLASSIC EXAMPLE OF HOW FAR THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY HAS FALLEN i DID NOT LEAVE THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY. THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY MOVED IN A DIRECTION i CANNOT SUPPORT. THOSE OF YOU WHO WANT TO OBJECTIVELY WITH AN OPEN MIND WILL SEE THAT TRUMP IS WHERE THE DEMOCRATS OF MY YOUTH WERE. DON’T BE BOUND BY LABELS THAT MEAN NOTHING. THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY HAS NO INTEGRITY PUTTING UP HILLARY WHO BRIBED HER WAY TO MILLIONS AS SECRETARY OF STATE AND WHO WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF PRESIDENT OBAMA AND THE DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE DESTROYED IN DIRECT VIOLATION FO THE ALSW DOCUMENTS THT HAD BEEN SUPPOEANED BY ONGRESS.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. Thank you Mr. Hughes for providing some clarity on this election from a conservative point of view.

    I follow a woman named Katherine Brock on Facebook. Today she also made comment on this election. I am including an excerpt from that post as response to your thought, because it affirms your realization that resistance to Mr. Trump will be fierce and possibly unprecedented.

    Like it or not, Hillary may well surpass Mr. Trump by over a million votes when the final count is tabulated That is unprecedented. It will be impossible for many Americans to accept his “victory”.

    Ms. Brock warns us of three key elements to watch for in the coming days:

    “1) Treat every poisoned word as a promise. When a bigoted blusterer tells you he intends to force members of a religious minority to register with the authorities, believe him. Take the haters at their word, and assume the worst is imminent. ”

    (I would add this to Ms. Brock’s analysis: When he makes fun of disabled persons, know that he wishes us to hate them as well. When he threatens to form a “special” police force to round up 30 million people, believe that he intends to do it, and that police force may be used against you if you speak out against him. The Constitution means nothing to this man. When he urges his supporters to “Knock the crap out of “em”, understand he is urging his supporters to take action against any who would criticize or oppose him. Be warned.)

    “2) You should treat people like adults, which means respecting them enough to demand that they understand the consequences of their actions.

    Whether you choose to forgive those friends and strangers alike who cast their votes so deplorably, is a matter of personal choice, and none but the most imperious among us would advocate a categorical rejection of millions based on their electoral actions, no matter how irresponsible and dim. So while you make these personal calculations, remember that what matters now isn’t analysis: It’s survival.

    3) Refuse to accept what’s going on as the new normal. Not now, not ever. In the months and years to come, decisions will be made that may strike you as perfectly sound, appointments announced that are inspired, and policies enacted you may even like.

    Friends and pundits will reach out to you and, invoking nuance, urge you to admit that there’s really nothing to fear, that things are more complex, that nothing is ever black or white. It’s a perfectly sound argument, of course, but it’s also dead wrong: This isn’t about policy or appointments or even about outcomes. This isn’t a political contest—it’s a moral crisis.

    When an inexperienced, thin-skinned demagogue rides into office by explaining away immensely complex problems while arguing that our national glory demands we strip millions of their dignity or their rights, our only duty is to resist by whatever means permitted us by law. The demagogue may boost the economy, sign beneficial treaties, and mend our ailing institutions, but his success can never be ours.

    Our greatness, to use a tired but true phrase, depends on our goodness, and to succeed, we must demand that our commander in chief come as close as is possible to reflecting the light of that goodness. ”

    I couldn’t agree more with Ms. Brock

    Liked by 2 people

    • Yes, this sounds very good. Great rhetoric.

      Too bad it makes absolutely no sense. “This isn’t about policy or appointments or even about outcomes.” What? Yes, it is about those things — to most people. Granted, there are some people for whom this is all about how it makes them FEEL, and the FEELING of ‘moral crisis’ and self-righteousness is more important than the problems of a stagnant economy or managing a bloated budget or enforcing the laws or preventing the further importation of millions of poor people to further overstrain our schools and hospitals.

      And since when did we “demand that our commander in chief …[reflect] the light of that goodness”? Wasn’t it America’s progressives who taught us that various ‘personal’ sins like misogyny and sexual assault didn’t matter and, even when accompanied by perjury and obstruction of justice, were no basis for holding a commander in chief to account?

      Like

  32. To the author: Well said, but I would like to add that I do think Trump got a lot of surreptitious help and I’m not just talking about Russia directly. Without it, I don’t think he would have won. It might have been a squeaker, but I think Hillary would have won. I would also add that her reputation as “evil” was deliberately created over time because they knew she was coming for the White House. Rarely is anything as it seems and particularly when propagandized to serve an agenda. People are prone to believe the worst, even good people will have doubts if they hear the same thing over and over. Vladimir Lenin penned “A lie told often enough becomes the truth.” As an aside, who does Steve Bannon self-identify as? A Leninist.

    Liked by 3 people

      • I agree, except that she didn’t seem to have policies that would directly help their lifestyle. They don’t want to be “techy types.” They want to work with their hands and maybe all the talk of “fancy smansy” solar panels, wind farms, and the like went right over their head. Most of those areas are still not convinced of climate change so I think their kneejerk reaction to building an infrastructure to deal with it was dismissed because it’s connected to their disbelief. Just a thought. Plus, Trump “spoke their language” and he’s a big “broad-shouldered” guy, if you get what I’m saying.

        Liked by 1 person

  33. The opinions in this article are quite correct except in one area. He falls short in understanding that voting for a presidential candidate is not endorsing the personal life and background. In addition to that he demonstrates that he has not listened to the what Donald Trump has been saying. Instead the author fills in the blank with the opinion voiced by Hilary and the liberal media. In fact Donald Trump has run one of the most accepting and loving campaigns I have ever seen. I have listened very closely to see if what the media has said is correct…..IT IS NOT.
    In American politics if you say anything that the media disagrees with they misquote, lie and deliberately misquote you. The campaign we just experienced was 90% false. Now I am sure that Sean believes he is expressing the truth. However he is not. In time I hope he can see and learn what I have seen. But he must stop listening to the media and the democrats in order to find what the truth is. He will never get to the truth using his current sources of information.
    I challenge anyone reading this to listen and learn. The campaign is over and the truth is not there. Feel free to message me or just listen to P E Donald Trump to learn who he is. I believe he is one of Americas greatest heroes. That he has a great chance to be one of America’s best presidents and that his leadership will make America stronger and better.

    Like

  34. Thank you for your compassionate words and your stark clarity. Thank you for giving me, a total bleeding-hearted softie liberal, hope that we can unite alongside common values and decency. Thank you for putting America and humanity first. Thank you for being willing to see the sources of division and suffering in this society and world. I pray if the situation were reversed politically that I would have the integrity to do the same as conservatives like you, putting humanity before my politics.

    Like

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